Tech Tour Day Eight: Photos From MSU

EAST LANSING — The Engineering Society of Detroit’s 2015 Fall Tech Tour wrapped up Friday, Oct. 23 at Michigan State University.

Enjoy these photos of the tour, taken by Matt Roush, ESD’s Director of Communications and Public Relations.

The Tech Tour was sponsored by Michigan Technological University.

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Mahmoodul Haq, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at Michigan State University’s Composite Vehicle Research Center, with a piece of composite made with waste cotton fibers. Of interest to automakers and builders, it looks a lot like granite.
An example of joining dissimilar materials -- metal and composite -- in Mahmoodul Haq's office at Michigan State.
An example of joining dissimilar materials — metal and composite — in Mahmoodul Haq’s office at Michigan State.

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Mahmoodul Haq with his corner of the lab at the Composite Vehicle Research Center
Mahmoodul Haq with his corner of the lab at the Composite Vehicle Research Center

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MSU's new 130,000-square-foot, $61 million bioengineering building.
MSU’s new 130,000-square-foot, $61 million bioengineering building.

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Get ready, get set, smash some atoms! This is the top of the main acceleration chamber at Michigan State's $730 million Facility for Rare Isotope Beams.
Get ready, get set, smash some atoms! This is the top of the main acceleration chamber at Michigan State’s $730 million Facility for Rare Isotope Beams.

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It's a good 35 feet down to the bottom of the main acceleration chamber.
It’s a good 35 feet down to the bottom of the main acceleration chamber.

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A view to the surface from the bottom of the FRIB.
A view to the surface from the bottom of the FRIB.
This labyrinth prevents any stray particles from leaving the acceleration chamber.
This labyrinth prevents any stray particles from leaving the acceleration chamber.
The main stretch of the particle accelerator is about 600 feet long -- four stories underground.
The main stretch of the particle accelerator is about 600 feet long — four stories underground.
Todd Elkin, Integration Engineer III with the FRIB project’s construction manager, Barton Malow. led the tour.
Todd Elkin, Integration Engineer III with the FRIB project’s construction manager, Barton Malow. led the tour.

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A look up from the acceleration chamber where the ion beam will be fed into the FRIB.
A look up from the acceleration chamber where the ion beam will be fed into the FRIB.

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Part of the electrical machinery that will handle 14 megawatts when the FRIB is accelerating atomic nuclei to half the speed of light.
Part of the electrical machinery that will handle 14 megawatts when the FRIB is accelerating atomic nuclei to half the speed of light.

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At ground level of the FRIB, this long room will house the data-crunching computers.
At ground level of the FRIB, this long room will house the data-crunching computers.
In the shop area of MSU's existing National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, workers are building the machinery that will accelerate atomic nuclei at the FRIB when it goes online six or seven years from now.
In the shop area of MSU’s existing National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, workers are building the machinery that will accelerate atomic nuclei at the FRIB when it goes online six or seven years from now.

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One of the huge magnets that will steer the beam of atomic nuclei.
One of the huge magnets that will steer the beam of atomic nuclei.
This nifty model shows what the FRIB will look like when it's completed.
This nifty model shows what the FRIB will look like when it’s completed.

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