Category Archives: Higher Education

International call-in to highlight Monday’s M2 TechCast

ROYAL OAK — One half of the hosting team at the M2 TechCast will be calling in from overseason for the program’s Monday, June 26 edition.

The show will start at 3 p.m. Eastern time Monday at http://www.podcastdetroit.com.

Mike Brennan, founder and publisher of Michigan Technology News, will phone in from Israel, where he is covering the 7th International Cyber Week at Tel Aviv University. Organizers of the event invited Brennan to attend.

At 3:15, Tricia Walding of the Workforce Intelligence Network for Southeast Michigan will outline WIN’s recently released Connected and Automated Vehicles Social Network Analysis.

At 3:30, Keith Brophy, director of the Michigan Small Business Development Center, will interview Bhushan Kulkarni, Chairman of GDI Infotech and CEO of InfoReady Corp. Bhushan is also co-chair of BBM BizCon 2017, a conference taking place on July 6 in Grand Rapids.

Wrapping up the show at 3:45 will be Dr. Sibrina Collins, director of Lawrence Technological University’s Marburger STEM Center, the home of LTU’s K-12 and STEM outreach programs. She’ll provide the latest details on LTU’s high school and middle school summer science and technology camps, the Marburger STEM Center Ambassadors Program, and the recent ribbon-cutting of a high-tech outdoor classroom at Detroit’s Sampson-Webber Leadership Academy.

The M2 TechCast will not air Monday, July 3 in observance of the Independence Day holiday. It will return Monday, July 10.

The M2 TechCast airs live on the internet from 3 to 4 p.m. Eastern time each Monday at http://www.podcastdetroit.com. And you can listen to past episodes by clicking on http://www.podcastdetroit.com/artist/mi-tech-cast/.

The M2 TechCast is hosted by Brennan and Matt Roush, director of the university news bureau at Lawrence Technological University in Southfield. Both covered high tech in Michigan as journalists for more than 20 years.

The M2 TechCast is part of Podcast Detroit, a network of more than 50 locally produced podcasts on a wide variety of topics, anchored by IT in the D. the nation’s No. 1 tech podcast, which regularly draws more than 500,000 listeners a week. IT in the D airs live Monday nights from 9 to 11 p.m. Eastern time.

 

MCWT Hits $1M Mark In Scholarships For Women In Tech

DETROIT — Eleven technology-oriented women received scholarships at a Michigan Council of Women in Technology Foundation event on June 20 in Birmingham. The women are pursuing degrees that will prepare them for future careers in areas such as cyber security, machine learning, software engineering and bioinformatics.

Over the past 12 years, the nonprofit has awarded nearly $1,033,000 to fuel the educational pursuits of 135 of the state’s future technology talent. A strong network of partner companies who support a diverse IT industry in Michigan makes the program possible.

“If I can put aside financial concerns, I intend to focus on volunteering in student outreach programs to enable other girls in Michigan to take more interest in technology-related fields,” said Shazeen Biviji, who plans to study computer engineering at the University of Michigan. “By partaking in more MCWT activities, I can hone my skills as an engineer, make lasting connections with others, and encourage younger girls to develop an interest in coding.”

MCWT’s 2017 scholarship recipients include:

  • Friends of MCWT Foundation Scholarship: Allison Hurley and Ashley Risinger
  • MCWT Lifetime Achievement Scholarship: Saika Islam
  • MCWT Scholarship: Nouralhouda Baalwi, Eleanor Epskamp-Hunt, Renee Paniccia, Ayah Awadallah, Shazeen Biviji, Khansa Alhaidi and Dejamaree Davis

Breanna Howey, Alhaidi, Awadallah, and Davis received laptop scholarships.

“Computer science is a crucial building block of today’s world of technology,” said Islam, a future University of Michigan student who realized she wanted to study coding and computer science during the MCWT-sponsored Girls are IT! program. “I’m amazed by how a few simple lines of code can lead to the creation of some of the world’s most powerful machines. I want to be a part of this extraordinary process. I want to change the world through my keystrokes, as well.”

Scholarship donors this year included MCWT partners Continental, Consumers Energy, Credit Acceptance, Dell, Oracle and NiTS Solutions.

“Surpassing the $1 million mark in scholarships is a big milestone for MCWT,” said Carey Pachla, president of the Michigan Council of Women in Technology Foundation. “It’s an example of our mission in action – inspiring and growing women in technology – and the power of bringing together businesses and academic leaders to promote the pursuit of meaningful and rewarding technology careers. Diversity in IT will continue to strengthen Michigan’s economy.”

MCWT’s efforts to inspire and grow women in technology in Michigan are fueled in part by 90 partners who provide scholarships, event support and Foundation programming throughout the year. Diamond elite, diamond, emerald, platinum, gold and bronze partners include: Ford Motor Co., General Motors, FCA US LLC, Ally, AT&T, Cisco, Dow, Epitec Inc., Fujitsu, IBM, STG, Accenture, Credit Acceptance, Consumers Energy, Covisint, Executive Search Partners,  Fast Switch Ltd., Intel, NetApp, NiTS, Nutanix, TD Ameritrade, VMWare, Blue Care Network, Deloitte, Delphi, Dynatrace, KLA Laboratories, Lawrence Technological University, Meijer, Mercedes Benz Financial Services, Oracle, Quicken Loans, University of Detroit-Mercy, University of Michigan-Dearborn, Vertiv, Wayne Country Community College District, Wayne State University, Access, Acro, Amway, AppDynamics, CA, Chrysalis, Comerica, Commercial Progression, Dell, EMC, GTB, Harman, HP, HMG Strategy, Information Builders, Meta7, Microsoft, New Horizons, Okta, Ost, Plante Moran, Pega Systems, Ricoh, RSA, Secure 24, SIM, TEKsystems, Whirlpool, AMI Strategies, Career Builder, Cherwell, Cognizant, Continental, Davenport University, Gordon Food Service, Grand Circus, Henry Ford Health System, JDM, Lightower Fiber Networks, Netlink, OnStar, OpTech, Randstad, Red Level, Saginaw Valley State University, Softura, Spectrum Health, Thirdware, V2Soft, We Build Character, Web Savvy Marketing, and ZF TRW.

MCWT supporters also contribute to scholarships through Friends of MCWT.

The Michigan Council of Women in Technology Foundation strives to inspire and grow women in technology fields, aspiring to make Michigan the No. 1 state for women in technology. The organization supports Michigan’s female IT workforce, students, corporate partners, schools and the overall community with programming, scholarships, networking, learning, mentoring, and technology experiences. Find more information at www.mcwt.org and connect via LinkedIn and Facebook.

FCA Drive for Design Winners Show The Dodges Of 2047

AUBURN HILLS — Long, flowing shapes accented with razor-sharp edges, inlets and exits that tap into cooling airflow with minimal drag, and wheels sized to leave little room for anything else – these are the design keys for Dodge three decades from now.

Three talented high school students from Georgia, Delaware and Michigan have earned top honors in the 2017 Drive for Design contest, sponsored by the FCA US Product Design Office. The contest, in its fifth year, challenged high school students across the United States in grades 10-12 to design a Dodge vehicle 30 years in the future.

Continue reading FCA Drive for Design Winners Show The Dodges Of 2047

SVSU to use Dow grant to prepare ‘chief science officers’

UNIVERSITY CENTER — Saginaw Valley State University hopes to send students back to their K-12 schools to serve as leaders and “chief science officers” when the new school year begins in the fall.

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LTU wins grant to boost STEM education from Howard Hughes Medical Institute

SOUTHFIELD – Lawrence Technological University is one of 24 schools nationwide to be selected for a new program to boost minority participation in STEM study and careers.

The $1 million grant was awarded to Lawrence Tech under the Inclusive Excellence Initiative of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the largest private, nonprofit supporter of science education in the United States. More than 500 colleges and universities nationwide applied for grants under the initiative. Lawrence Tech was the only institution in Michigan to be selected.

The objective of the initiative is to help colleges and universities encourage participation and cultivate the talent of more students in the natural sciences. HHMI challenged schools to identify the reasons students are excluded from science and find new ways to include students in opportunities to achieve science excellence. In particular, the HHMI initiative focuses on those undergraduates who come to college from diverse backgrounds and pathways. These “new majority” students include under-represented ethnic minorities, first-generation college students, and working adults with families.

Said HHMI President Erin O’Shea: “The challenges this program addresses are important for all of us who care deeply about developing a more inclusive and diverse scientific community.”

Finding a way to include all students, from all backgrounds, in STEM is critical for building future generations of American scientists, said David Asai, senior director for science education at HHMI. “Science excellence depends on having a community of scientists that is rich in diversity of people and perspectives,” Asai said.

A third of U.S. first-year college students intending to study STEM are underrepresented minorities (green). But only one-sixth of STEM baccalaureate degree recipients (turquoise) and one-tenth of STEM PhDs (blue) are underrepresented minorities. (Graphic by Howard Hughes Medical Institute.)

In Lawrence Tech’s case, the goal of the project is to “revolutionize teaching in the College of Arts and Sciences, transforming it into a college that bases its education on classroom-based research experience,” or CRE, said Lior Shamir, associate professor of mathematics and computer science.

Shamir said courses in multiple disciplines, covering all departments and programs in the college, will be modified into CRE courses, providing research experiences to all students as part of the curriculum. And, Shamir said, these experiences “will be designed in a culturally responsive fashion, allowing students to express their culture and identity through research.”

Shamir said participating in research as an undergraduate student has been proven to increase student retention and graduation rates, as well as boosting GPA and the likelihood of moving on to graduate school.

For decades, educational grants – including some awarded by HHMI – have focused on interventions aimed at students, such as summer research apprenticeships, tutoring, advising, and summer bridge programs designed to ease the transition from high school to college. While these interventions can help the students involved, they don’t generally address long-term issues that, if changed, could have a more sustained impact, Asai said. “Our goal is to catalyze changes that last well beyond the lifetime of these five-year grants,” he said.

An essay by Asai on the topic, “A New Strategy to Build Capacity for Creativity,” is available at https://www.hhmi.org/content/new-strategy-build-capacity-creativity-science-education.

“This award shows once again how Lawrence Tech is truly living its longtime motto of ‘Theory and Practice,’” LTU President Virinder Moudgil said. “Adding research experiences to all classes in the College of Arts and Sciences that are relevant to each student’s cultural background will increase the likelihood of student success, and will increase participation and excellence among people who are now under-represented in science.”

Lawrence Technological University, http://www.ltu.edu, is a private university founded in 1932 that offers more than 100 programs through the doctoral level in its Colleges of Architecture and Design, Arts and Sciences, Engineering, and Management. PayScale lists Lawrence Tech among the nation’s top 100 universities for the salaries of its graduates, and U.S. News and World Report lists it in the top tier of best Midwestern universities. Students benefit from small class sizes and a real-world, hands-on, “theory and practice” education with an emphasis on leadership. Activities on Lawrence Tech’s 107-acre campus include more than 60 student organizations and NAIA varsity sports.

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute, http://www.hhmi.org, plays a powerful role in advancing scientific research and education in the United States. Its scientists, located across the country and around the world, include 17 Nobel laureates. They have made important discoveries that advance both human health and our fundamental understanding of biology. The Institute also aims to transform science education into a creative, interdisciplinary endeavor that reflects the excitement of real research.

LTU Offers $600,000 Scholarships To Video Gamers

SOUTHFIELD – Lawrence Technological University offered $600,000 in scholarships to the winners and runners-up of the first-ever E-Sports Michigan Invitational video game tournament, held Saturday on LTU’s Southfield campus.

Some 75 students from 15 high schools in the Detroit area competed. LTU and the State Champs! high school sports TV show sponsored the event.

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Baker College adds online grad degrees in cloud security risk management

FLINT — Baker College will launch two graduate degrees fall 2017 for those wishing to enter or advance in the cybersecurity field: an MBA in cloud security risk management and a Master of Science in information systems (MSIS) in cloud security risk management. Enrollment is now open for courses that begin Aug. 28.

“These new graduate degrees will help address the critical need for cyber and cloud security professionals in the U.S. as cyberattacks, security breaches, compliance challenges and new technologies fuel demand for qualified workers,” said Jill Langen, president of Baker College Online and its Center for Graduate Studies.

Courses in the concentration of cloud security risk management will be provided through a partnership with Mission Critical Institute (MCI) of Reston, Va. MCI is a developer of cybersecurity education programs recognized by the Department of Homeland Security.

“Baker College stood out as an excellent partner because its online programs are rated among the top in the nation, and it offers strong undergraduate cyber defense programs,” said V. N. Berlin, Ph.D., MCI president. “The two organizations are also aligned in focusing on career education that meets workforce needs by preparing students to be job-ready at graduation.”

Baker College appoints MCI-certified expert practicing cybersecurity faculty to teach and mentor students through practitioner-oriented cybersecurity curriculum. Major courses will include in-depth exam preparation for certifications needed for cybersecurity employment in business and government.

The curriculum is based on the U.S. government’s recommended set of industry standards and best practices developed by the Department of Commerce’s National Institute of Standards and Technology to help organizations manage cybersecurity risks.

For more information about the two new degrees in cloud security risk management, contact Christine Olyer, MCI program manager, at colyer@mci-cyber.org.

Baker College is a not-for-profit higher education institution accredited by the Higher Learning Commission. Founded in 1911, Baker grants doctoral, master’s, bachelor’s and associate degrees, as well as certificates in diverse academic fields including applied technology, business, education, engineering, health science, information technology and social science. There are Baker campuses in Allen Park, Auburn Hills, Cadillac, Cass City, Clinton Township, Coldwater, Flint, Fremont, Jackson, NMuskegon, Owosso and Port Huron in Michigan, and in Reading, Pa.  that can be completed 100 percent online without ever visiting a campus. For information, visit http://www.baker.edu.

MSU Names New Chemical Engineering and Materials Science Chair

EAST LANSING — Donald Morelli, who has been interim chair of the Michigan State University Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science for almost two years, has been named chair of the department following a national search. His appointment is effective June 1.

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Internet2 Names New President, CEO

ANN ARBOR — Internet2, the non-profit high-speed networking consortium led by the research and education communities, has named veteran broadband executive Howard Pfeffer its new president and CEO.

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Southfield celebrates progress, LTU partnership at State of the City

SOUTHFIELD – About 300 people got a peek at the future of Lawrence Technological University and the rest of Southfield and Lathrup Village at the Southfield Area Chamber of Commerce’s annual State of the City luncheon, featuring Southfield Mayor Ken Siver and Lathrup Village Mayor Frank Brock Jr.

The venue was the spectacularly remodeled former Southfield Holiday Inn, the iconic circular hotel on Telegraph Road just south of I-696. It’s scheduled to reopen in April as a 192-room Best Western Premier after a $3.6 million remodeling by a New Zealand-based hospitality firm.

The Epicurean Restaurant Group, which formerly operated Detroit’s Coach Insignia restaurant atop the Renaissance Center, will handle food at the new Best Western, and provided the food for Monday’s event.

Siver lauded Lawrence Tech’s role in the city’s continuing redevelopment, especially the Southfield City Centre project, which seeks to create a walkable, mixed-use downtown area along Evergreen Road from 10 Mile Road north to the Southfield municipal complex.

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