Tag Archives: Lawrence Technological University

LTU event to show how Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality and Immersive Reality affect business

SOUTHFIELD – From immersive virtual reality (VR) caves to head-mounted devices (HMDs) to augmented reality (AR) headsets and more, a program at Lawrence Technological University will give attendees a chance to learn about these new tools in a relaxed environment and discover the positive impact they may have on the way business gets done.

Join the LTU Collaboratory on Thursday, Sept. 7 for a symposium from 8 a.m. to noon in the UTLC Gallery on the LTU campus, 21000 W. 10 Mile Road, Southfield, for a hands-on demonstrations of the DAQRI Smart Helmet, the Microsoft Hololens, the HTC Vive, the Oculus Rift, and a demonstration of immersive cave technology.

Expert presenters will include:

  • Jeff Brum from Mechdyne, on applications of virtual reality from training firefighters to developing a virtual aquarium for a research institute
  • Simon Wealans from DAQRI on how the smart helmet they developed can use augmented reality to save lives on the battlefield, help first responders in cities, and train new workers
  • Steve Couchman from LivePicture on how virtual reality headsets can be used in a design or marketing workflow

Registration is $15 if booked online at www.ltucollaboratory.com/events/ar-vr-ir-oh-my, or $20 at the door. A continental breakfast is included.

The event is sponsored by the LTU Collaboratory in partnership with the City of Southfield Centrepolis SmartZone and the Michigan Economic Development Corp.

For more information on how the LTU Collaboratory can help your company innovate and grow, visit www.ltucollaboratory.com.

Lawrence Technological University, http://www.ltu.edu, is a private university founded in 1932 that offers more than 100 programs through the doctoral level in its Colleges of Architecture and Design, Arts and Sciences, Engineering, and Management. PayScale lists Lawrence Tech among the nation’s top 100 universities for the salaries of its graduates, and U.S. News and World Report lists it in the top tier of best Midwestern universities. Students benefit from small class sizes and a real-world, hands-on, “theory and practice” education with an emphasis on leadership. Activities on Lawrence Tech’s 107-acre campus include more than 60 student organizations and NAIA varsity sports.

Ford exec tells LTU frosh: ‘You’re the right people at the right time in the right city’

SOUTHFIELD —

A Ford Motor Co. executive told Lawrence Technological University’s incoming first-year students Friday that when it comes to their higher education, “It’s the right time, you’re the right people, and you’re in the right city.”

Klevorn spoke at LTU’s annual Convocation ceremony, held to welcome first-year students and their families. During the event, she received LTU’s fourth annual Global Citizen Award, presented annually to individuals who have shown great character and leadership in addressing global issues and promoting international understanding. LTU welcomed about 500 students at the event, held at its Ridler Field House.

Continue reading Ford exec tells LTU frosh: ‘You’re the right people at the right time in the right city’

Mobile tech, Southfield City Centre, women in tech on today’s M2 TechCast

ROYAL OAK — The Monday, Aug. 14 edition of the M2 TechCast podcast will feature a jam-packed lineup of technology and economic development newsmakers.

Continue reading Mobile tech, Southfield City Centre, women in tech on today’s M2 TechCast

Designing a better Detroit: Lawrence Tech class gives Denby High students a hands-on look at architecture, design

DETROIT – A high school class in architecture, taught in the spring 2016 semester by Lawrence Technological University staff, has produced at least one budding architect, as well as a whole bunch of good ideas on building a better bus shelter.

Continue reading Designing a better Detroit: Lawrence Tech class gives Denby High students a hands-on look at architecture, design

LTU researching autonomous taxi with gifts from MOBIS, Dataspeed, SoarTech, Realtime Technologies

SOUTHFIELD — Lawrence Technological University has begun the research and development of an autonomous campus taxi thanks to donations from several corporate partners.

Hyundai MOBIS, the parts and service division of the Korean automaker, donated $15,000 for the purchase of a Polaris GEM e2 two-seat electric vehicle. Dataspeed Inc., a Rochester Hills engineering firm specializing in mobile robotics and autonomous vehicle technology, converted the vehicle to an autonomous drive-by-wire system.

Also donating to the effort were a pair of Ann Arbor high-tech firms – Soar Technology Inc. provided a LIDAR (laser-based radar) unit to help the vehicle find its way, while Realtime Technologies Inc., a simulation technology firm, provided a cash donation.

Hyundai MOBIS formally turned the keys of the vehicle over to LTU Provost Maria Vaz and C.J. Chung, professor of computer science, in a ceremony on the LTU campus last week. Vaz thanked the sponsors for providing a great learning and research opportunity. David Agnew, director of advanced engineering at MOBIS, made the presentation.

David Agnew of MOBIS hands over the keys of a Polaris GEM e2 converted to a drive-by-wire EV by Dataspeed Inc. to Maria Vaz, LTU Vice President and Provost. (Photo by Matt Roush)

LTU computer science students have already won an international award with the vehicle. They developed software to make the car operate autonomously – well enough that it took first place in the new Spec 2 division of the Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition, held at Oakland University in June. The Spec 2 competition required multiple self-driving vehicle functions such as lane following, lane change, traffic sign detection, obstacle avoidance, and left turns.

After winning at IGVC, team members began reprogramming the vehicle to serve as an autonomous taxi on the LTU campus. It’s been rechristened ACT, an acronym for Autonomous Campus Transport/Taxi, in a naming contest won by Nick Paul, one of the team members. Chung said the university is planning to introduce Level 3 autonomy with the vehicle – allowing both hands and eyes off the road – by August 2018.

A video of the car in competition at the IGVC is available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kSzxPp66vxk&feature=youtu.be.

From left to right are C.J. Chung (LTU faculty); Serge Danielson-Francois (LTU faculty); Gordon Stein (LTU faculty); Devson Butani (LTU mechanical engineering student); Chris Kawatsu (SoarTech); Avram Kluger (LTU advancement staff); David Agnew (MOBIS); Mitchell Pleune (LTU computer science student); Jane Tarakhovsky (MOBIS), Nick Paul (LTU computer science student), Patrick Nelson (LTU faculty), Maria Vaz (LTU Provost), Brian Neumeyer (Dataspeed), Alex Sebastian (Dataspeed), and Howard Davis (LTU advancement staff). (Photo by Matt Roush)

Lawrence Technological University, http://www.ltu.edu, is a private university founded in 1932 that offers more than 100 programs through the doctoral level in its Colleges of Architecture and Design, Arts and Sciences, Engineering, and Management. PayScale lists Lawrence Tech among the nation’s top 100 universities for the salaries of its graduates, and U.S. News and World Report lists it in the top tier of best Midwestern universities. Students benefit from small class sizes and a real-world, hands-on, “theory and practice” education with an emphasis on leadership. Activities on Lawrence Tech’s 107-acre campus include more than 60 student organizations and NAIA varsity sports.

Auto Tech, STEM Education, Women In Tech On Today’s M2 TechCast

ROYAL OAK — Visits with several regular guests will make up three-quarters of the Monday, July 17 M2 TechCast.

Continue reading Auto Tech, STEM Education, Women In Tech On Today’s M2 TechCast

International call-in to highlight Monday’s M2 TechCast

ROYAL OAK — One half of the hosting team at the M2 TechCast will be calling in from overseason for the program’s Monday, June 26 edition.

The show will start at 3 p.m. Eastern time Monday at http://www.podcastdetroit.com.

Mike Brennan, founder and publisher of Michigan Technology News, will phone in from Israel, where he is covering the 7th International Cyber Week at Tel Aviv University. Organizers of the event invited Brennan to attend.

At 3:15, Tricia Walding of the Workforce Intelligence Network for Southeast Michigan will outline WIN’s recently released Connected and Automated Vehicles Social Network Analysis.

At 3:30, Keith Brophy, director of the Michigan Small Business Development Center, will interview Bhushan Kulkarni, Chairman of GDI Infotech and CEO of InfoReady Corp. Bhushan is also co-chair of BBM BizCon 2017, a conference taking place on July 6 in Grand Rapids.

Wrapping up the show at 3:45 will be Dr. Sibrina Collins, director of Lawrence Technological University’s Marburger STEM Center, the home of LTU’s K-12 and STEM outreach programs. She’ll provide the latest details on LTU’s high school and middle school summer science and technology camps, the Marburger STEM Center Ambassadors Program, and the recent ribbon-cutting of a high-tech outdoor classroom at Detroit’s Sampson-Webber Leadership Academy.

The M2 TechCast will not air Monday, July 3 in observance of the Independence Day holiday. It will return Monday, July 10.

The M2 TechCast airs live on the internet from 3 to 4 p.m. Eastern time each Monday at http://www.podcastdetroit.com. And you can listen to past episodes by clicking on http://www.podcastdetroit.com/artist/mi-tech-cast/.

The M2 TechCast is hosted by Brennan and Matt Roush, director of the university news bureau at Lawrence Technological University in Southfield. Both covered high tech in Michigan as journalists for more than 20 years.

The M2 TechCast is part of Podcast Detroit, a network of more than 50 locally produced podcasts on a wide variety of topics, anchored by IT in the D. the nation’s No. 1 tech podcast, which regularly draws more than 500,000 listeners a week. IT in the D airs live Monday nights from 9 to 11 p.m. Eastern time.

 

FCA Drive for Design Winners Show The Dodges Of 2047

AUBURN HILLS — Long, flowing shapes accented with razor-sharp edges, inlets and exits that tap into cooling airflow with minimal drag, and wheels sized to leave little room for anything else – these are the design keys for Dodge three decades from now.

Three talented high school students from Georgia, Delaware and Michigan have earned top honors in the 2017 Drive for Design contest, sponsored by the FCA US Product Design Office. The contest, in its fifth year, challenged high school students across the United States in grades 10-12 to design a Dodge vehicle 30 years in the future.

Continue reading FCA Drive for Design Winners Show The Dodges Of 2047

LTU wins grant to boost STEM education from Howard Hughes Medical Institute

SOUTHFIELD – Lawrence Technological University is one of 24 schools nationwide to be selected for a new program to boost minority participation in STEM study and careers.

The $1 million grant was awarded to Lawrence Tech under the Inclusive Excellence Initiative of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the largest private, nonprofit supporter of science education in the United States. More than 500 colleges and universities nationwide applied for grants under the initiative. Lawrence Tech was the only institution in Michigan to be selected.

The objective of the initiative is to help colleges and universities encourage participation and cultivate the talent of more students in the natural sciences. HHMI challenged schools to identify the reasons students are excluded from science and find new ways to include students in opportunities to achieve science excellence. In particular, the HHMI initiative focuses on those undergraduates who come to college from diverse backgrounds and pathways. These “new majority” students include under-represented ethnic minorities, first-generation college students, and working adults with families.

Said HHMI President Erin O’Shea: “The challenges this program addresses are important for all of us who care deeply about developing a more inclusive and diverse scientific community.”

Finding a way to include all students, from all backgrounds, in STEM is critical for building future generations of American scientists, said David Asai, senior director for science education at HHMI. “Science excellence depends on having a community of scientists that is rich in diversity of people and perspectives,” Asai said.

A third of U.S. first-year college students intending to study STEM are underrepresented minorities (green). But only one-sixth of STEM baccalaureate degree recipients (turquoise) and one-tenth of STEM PhDs (blue) are underrepresented minorities. (Graphic by Howard Hughes Medical Institute.)

In Lawrence Tech’s case, the goal of the project is to “revolutionize teaching in the College of Arts and Sciences, transforming it into a college that bases its education on classroom-based research experience,” or CRE, said Lior Shamir, associate professor of mathematics and computer science.

Shamir said courses in multiple disciplines, covering all departments and programs in the college, will be modified into CRE courses, providing research experiences to all students as part of the curriculum. And, Shamir said, these experiences “will be designed in a culturally responsive fashion, allowing students to express their culture and identity through research.”

Shamir said participating in research as an undergraduate student has been proven to increase student retention and graduation rates, as well as boosting GPA and the likelihood of moving on to graduate school.

For decades, educational grants – including some awarded by HHMI – have focused on interventions aimed at students, such as summer research apprenticeships, tutoring, advising, and summer bridge programs designed to ease the transition from high school to college. While these interventions can help the students involved, they don’t generally address long-term issues that, if changed, could have a more sustained impact, Asai said. “Our goal is to catalyze changes that last well beyond the lifetime of these five-year grants,” he said.

An essay by Asai on the topic, “A New Strategy to Build Capacity for Creativity,” is available at https://www.hhmi.org/content/new-strategy-build-capacity-creativity-science-education.

“This award shows once again how Lawrence Tech is truly living its longtime motto of ‘Theory and Practice,’” LTU President Virinder Moudgil said. “Adding research experiences to all classes in the College of Arts and Sciences that are relevant to each student’s cultural background will increase the likelihood of student success, and will increase participation and excellence among people who are now under-represented in science.”

Lawrence Technological University, http://www.ltu.edu, is a private university founded in 1932 that offers more than 100 programs through the doctoral level in its Colleges of Architecture and Design, Arts and Sciences, Engineering, and Management. PayScale lists Lawrence Tech among the nation’s top 100 universities for the salaries of its graduates, and U.S. News and World Report lists it in the top tier of best Midwestern universities. Students benefit from small class sizes and a real-world, hands-on, “theory and practice” education with an emphasis on leadership. Activities on Lawrence Tech’s 107-acre campus include more than 60 student organizations and NAIA varsity sports.

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute, http://www.hhmi.org, plays a powerful role in advancing scientific research and education in the United States. Its scientists, located across the country and around the world, include 17 Nobel laureates. They have made important discoveries that advance both human health and our fundamental understanding of biology. The Institute also aims to transform science education into a creative, interdisciplinary endeavor that reflects the excitement of real research.

Cybersecurity, venture capital and STEM education on the M2 TechCast today

ROYAL OAK – The Monday, April 17 edition of the M2 TechCast podcast has a jam-packed schedule of tech news. Here’s the lineup:

* At 3 p.m. Eastern time, Yan Ness, CEO of Ann Arbor-based Online Tech Inc., will announce a new merger for his managed services company.

* At 3:15 p.m., Mark Dreyer Sr., senior consultant at Novi-based IT consultants Red Level, will review his recent presentation at the Microsoft Cyber Security Summit.

* At 3:30 p.m.,  Emily Heintz, associate director of the Michigan Venture Capital Association, will discuss the recently released 2017 Michigan Venture Capital Report, which showed increased support for tech startups in Michigan.

* And at at 3:45 p.m., Selin Arslan, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Lawrence Technological University, will discuss the success of Blue Devil Motorsports, the university’s SAE racing teams, and how the program fits into the university’s STEM-focused education.

Continue reading Cybersecurity, venture capital and STEM education on the M2 TechCast today