Tag Archives: Lawrence Technological University

FCA Drive for Design Winners Show The Dodges Of 2047

AUBURN HILLS — Long, flowing shapes accented with razor-sharp edges, inlets and exits that tap into cooling airflow with minimal drag, and wheels sized to leave little room for anything else – these are the design keys for Dodge three decades from now.

Three talented high school students from Georgia, Delaware and Michigan have earned top honors in the 2017 Drive for Design contest, sponsored by the FCA US Product Design Office. The contest, in its fifth year, challenged high school students across the United States in grades 10-12 to design a Dodge vehicle 30 years in the future.

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LTU wins grant to boost STEM education from Howard Hughes Medical Institute

SOUTHFIELD – Lawrence Technological University is one of 24 schools nationwide to be selected for a new program to boost minority participation in STEM study and careers.

The $1 million grant was awarded to Lawrence Tech under the Inclusive Excellence Initiative of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the largest private, nonprofit supporter of science education in the United States. More than 500 colleges and universities nationwide applied for grants under the initiative. Lawrence Tech was the only institution in Michigan to be selected.

The objective of the initiative is to help colleges and universities encourage participation and cultivate the talent of more students in the natural sciences. HHMI challenged schools to identify the reasons students are excluded from science and find new ways to include students in opportunities to achieve science excellence. In particular, the HHMI initiative focuses on those undergraduates who come to college from diverse backgrounds and pathways. These “new majority” students include under-represented ethnic minorities, first-generation college students, and working adults with families.

Said HHMI President Erin O’Shea: “The challenges this program addresses are important for all of us who care deeply about developing a more inclusive and diverse scientific community.”

Finding a way to include all students, from all backgrounds, in STEM is critical for building future generations of American scientists, said David Asai, senior director for science education at HHMI. “Science excellence depends on having a community of scientists that is rich in diversity of people and perspectives,” Asai said.

A third of U.S. first-year college students intending to study STEM are underrepresented minorities (green). But only one-sixth of STEM baccalaureate degree recipients (turquoise) and one-tenth of STEM PhDs (blue) are underrepresented minorities. (Graphic by Howard Hughes Medical Institute.)

In Lawrence Tech’s case, the goal of the project is to “revolutionize teaching in the College of Arts and Sciences, transforming it into a college that bases its education on classroom-based research experience,” or CRE, said Lior Shamir, associate professor of mathematics and computer science.

Shamir said courses in multiple disciplines, covering all departments and programs in the college, will be modified into CRE courses, providing research experiences to all students as part of the curriculum. And, Shamir said, these experiences “will be designed in a culturally responsive fashion, allowing students to express their culture and identity through research.”

Shamir said participating in research as an undergraduate student has been proven to increase student retention and graduation rates, as well as boosting GPA and the likelihood of moving on to graduate school.

For decades, educational grants – including some awarded by HHMI – have focused on interventions aimed at students, such as summer research apprenticeships, tutoring, advising, and summer bridge programs designed to ease the transition from high school to college. While these interventions can help the students involved, they don’t generally address long-term issues that, if changed, could have a more sustained impact, Asai said. “Our goal is to catalyze changes that last well beyond the lifetime of these five-year grants,” he said.

An essay by Asai on the topic, “A New Strategy to Build Capacity for Creativity,” is available at https://www.hhmi.org/content/new-strategy-build-capacity-creativity-science-education.

“This award shows once again how Lawrence Tech is truly living its longtime motto of ‘Theory and Practice,’” LTU President Virinder Moudgil said. “Adding research experiences to all classes in the College of Arts and Sciences that are relevant to each student’s cultural background will increase the likelihood of student success, and will increase participation and excellence among people who are now under-represented in science.”

Lawrence Technological University, http://www.ltu.edu, is a private university founded in 1932 that offers more than 100 programs through the doctoral level in its Colleges of Architecture and Design, Arts and Sciences, Engineering, and Management. PayScale lists Lawrence Tech among the nation’s top 100 universities for the salaries of its graduates, and U.S. News and World Report lists it in the top tier of best Midwestern universities. Students benefit from small class sizes and a real-world, hands-on, “theory and practice” education with an emphasis on leadership. Activities on Lawrence Tech’s 107-acre campus include more than 60 student organizations and NAIA varsity sports.

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute, http://www.hhmi.org, plays a powerful role in advancing scientific research and education in the United States. Its scientists, located across the country and around the world, include 17 Nobel laureates. They have made important discoveries that advance both human health and our fundamental understanding of biology. The Institute also aims to transform science education into a creative, interdisciplinary endeavor that reflects the excitement of real research.

Cybersecurity, venture capital and STEM education on the M2 TechCast today

ROYAL OAK – The Monday, April 17 edition of the M2 TechCast podcast has a jam-packed schedule of tech news. Here’s the lineup:

* At 3 p.m. Eastern time, Yan Ness, CEO of Ann Arbor-based Online Tech Inc., will announce a new merger for his managed services company.

* At 3:15 p.m., Mark Dreyer Sr., senior consultant at Novi-based IT consultants Red Level, will review his recent presentation at the Microsoft Cyber Security Summit.

* At 3:30 p.m.,  Emily Heintz, associate director of the Michigan Venture Capital Association, will discuss the recently released 2017 Michigan Venture Capital Report, which showed increased support for tech startups in Michigan.

* And at at 3:45 p.m., Selin Arslan, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Lawrence Technological University, will discuss the success of Blue Devil Motorsports, the university’s SAE racing teams, and how the program fits into the university’s STEM-focused education.

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ESD Sponsoring Tour of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Affleck House in Bloomfield Hills

SOUTHFIELD — Join your fellow members of The Engineering Society of Detroit Friday, March 31 for a special tour of the first Frank Lloyd Wright-designed house built in the Detroit metropolitan area.

The Gregor S. & Elizabeth B. Affleck House, built in 1941 in Bloomfield Hills, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places before it was 50 years old.  The house represents one of the finest examples of the architect’s Usonian style — the last great period of Wright’s career — when his goal was to fill a need for low-cost housing for the average American.  Inspired by Wright’s Fallingwater house in Pennsylvania, the Afflecks requested him to design their new home.  Wright responded by directing Gregor and Elizabeth to find a beautiful site which others may have considered “unbuildable” — and then he proceeded to design a unique house in harmony with nature and the home’s steep hillside site.

The Affleck family donated the house to Lawrence Technological University in 1978 for educational use in the university’s architecture and design programs.

One of our tour’s acting docents, LTU assistant professor Janice K. Means — past Chair of the ESD Affiliate Council and a member of the LTU Affleck House Restoration Committee — said:  “Lawrence Tech has an ongoing project to restore this amazing house with its treed site.  Now we wish to share this gem with the community.”

She added: “I know of no other Frank Lloyd Wright house where attendees are invited to sit in original Wright-designed chairs and take personal photos within the house.”

Attendees will experience a few of Wright’s innovations in this house — his use of the then-exotic material we know today as plywood for much of the home’s furniture; the use of combined floor mounted operable  windows and high clerestory windows to enhance natural cooling; indirect lighting from cove-mounted luminaires; a cleverly concealed half bath tucked into minimal space; a surprising amount of built-in storage space; and radiant heating from hot water running through cast iron pipes in the floor, a system that is still in use today.

Due to the historical status and intimate nature of the Affleck House, many rooms and passageways are very narrow and therefore the house is not wheelchair accessible.  Limited photography, for personal use only, is permitted.  In consideration of our other guests, handheld cameras only, no tripods or flash photography.

To register call (248) 353-0735 x 222. or visit http://ww2.esd.org/EVENTS/2017/2017-03-FLW-House-tour.htm.

Southfield celebrates progress, LTU partnership at State of the City

SOUTHFIELD – About 300 people got a peek at the future of Lawrence Technological University and the rest of Southfield and Lathrup Village at the Southfield Area Chamber of Commerce’s annual State of the City luncheon, featuring Southfield Mayor Ken Siver and Lathrup Village Mayor Frank Brock Jr.

The venue was the spectacularly remodeled former Southfield Holiday Inn, the iconic circular hotel on Telegraph Road just south of I-696. It’s scheduled to reopen in April as a 192-room Best Western Premier after a $3.6 million remodeling by a New Zealand-based hospitality firm.

The Epicurean Restaurant Group, which formerly operated Detroit’s Coach Insignia restaurant atop the Renaissance Center, will handle food at the new Best Western, and provided the food for Monday’s event.

Siver lauded Lawrence Tech’s role in the city’s continuing redevelopment, especially the Southfield City Centre project, which seeks to create a walkable, mixed-use downtown area along Evergreen Road from 10 Mile Road north to the Southfield municipal complex.

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Social Media, LTU Outreach, High Tech Manufacturing, Cybersecurity on March 20 M2 TechCast

ROYAL OAK — Hope for more STEM students in the future and worries about the nation’s power grid are among the highlights to be broadcast live over the internet on the Monday, March 20 M2 TechCast.

The show begins at 3 p.m. Eastern time with Melih Oztalay of Inbound Marketing. He’ll discuss how web site marketability, content marketing, and social media marketing intersect.

At 3:15, Sibrina Collins, director of the Lawrence Technological University Marburger STEM Center will discuss LTU’s recent K-12 outreach events and an upcoming Science and Technology Showcase for science and biomedical engineering (BME) majors.

At 3:30, Jeff Hall from Siemens will talk about the Manufacturing in America conference, March 22-23 at the Renaissance Center.

The show wraps up at 3:45 with cybersecurity expert Dan Lohrmann, discussing hacker threats to the nation’s power grid.

The M2 TechCast airs live on the internet from 3 to 4 p.m. Eastern time each Monday at http://www.podcastdetroit.com. And you can listen to past episodes by clicking on http://www.podcastdetroit.com/artist/mi-tech-cast/.

The M2 TechCast is hosted by Mike Brennan, founder and publisher of Michigan Technology News, http://www.mitechnews.com, and Matt Roush, director of the university news bureau at Lawrence Technological University in Southfield. Both have covered high-tech in Michigan as journalists for more than 20 years.

The M2 TechCast is part of Podcast Detroit, a network of more than 50 locally produced podcasts on a wide variety of topics, anchored by IT in the D. the nation’s No. 1 tech podcast, which regularly draws more than 500,000 listeners a week. IT in the D airs live Monday nights from 9 to 11 p.m. Eastern time.

Albert Kahn’s legacy lives on in Detroit architecture – and Lawrence Tech symposium

SOUTHFIELD, Mich. – The spaces we build to live and work in influence the basic nature of our lives and careers for as long as those buildings last.

Friday, about 70 academics, researchers, and the architecturally curious gathered at Lawrence Technological University to review the work and legacy of legendary Detroit architect Albert Kahn in a daylong research symposium.

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Three more LTU students named University Innovation Fellows

SOUTHFIELD, Mich. – Three students from Lawrence Technological University have been named University Innovation Fellows.

LTU’s newest Fellows are Leah Hall, a sophomore from Kingsley; Aneeka Patel, a junior from Troy; and Joe Pishek, a sophomore from Plymouth. Hall is majoring in biomedical engineering, while Patel and Pishek are majoring in industrial engineering.

The University Innovation Fellows program trains students to improve education in entrepreneurship, design thinking and creativity at their schools. Fellows design innovation spaces, start entrepreneurship organizations, host experiential learning events and work with faculty to develop new courses.

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Lawrence Tech to build fourth residence hall

SOUTHFIELD – The Lawrence Technological University Board of Trustees approved construction of a new, 95,000-square-foot residence hall on its Southfield campus, to open in the fall of 2018.

The new residence hall will be four stories tall and include space for 300 students, along with 22 resident assistants and housing administration staff, according to Michael Guthrie, a partner at inForm Studio, the Northville architecture firm that is designing it.

All four principals at inForm are Lawrence Tech architecture alumni – Guthrie (Bachelor of Science in Architecture, 1995), Corey Lavigne (Bachelor of Architecture, 1996), Ken Van Tine (Bachelor of Science in Architecture, 1985, Bachelor of Architecture, 1986), and Gina Van Tine (Bachelor of Science in Architecture, 1989, Bachelor of Architecture, 1994).

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LTU Kahn events featured on M2 TechCast

SOUTHFIELD — Lawrence Technological University will celebrate the architectural legacy of the legendary Albert Kahn in several events and exhibitions in the days and weeks ahead.

LTU staff highlighted the events on a podcast last week.

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